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How Drug Companies Keep Prices High

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg presents cutting edge investigative journalism. An open letter to the Prime Minister in the British Medical Journal accuses drug companies of charging too much for medicines used in the treatment of rare diseases. But that's just one way in which the pharmaceutical industry protects its bottom line - and puts additional financial burden on the NHS. 5 live Investigates looks at the tactics used by the industry to keep prices high. They try to keep blockbuster drugs under licence - to prevent the manufacture of cheaper alternatives. Once a drug comes off licence, its price can drop by eighty percent. One delaying technique is to slightly alter a drug just as its licence comes to an end - and put the revised formulation under a new licence. Such techniques - some industry insiders say - is costing the NHS hundreds of millions of pounds a year. We speak to Warwick Smith from the British Generic Manufacturers Association; Alan Maynard, Professor of Health Policy at the University of York; and Richard Barker, Director General of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry. Also on the programme, the shocking allegation that 300 football games a season in top European leagues are being deliberately thrown. We spend time with Sportradar, the experts monitoring betting patterns across Europe, looking for signs of match fixing in the top flight football leagues. They believe they are seeing evidence of matches being deliberately thrown - and they're tracking the dodgy players and managers responsible. Our guests are Declan Hill, who has written book on match fixing, and Rob Faulkner, spokesman for UEFA. And taking on the fraudsters: Birmingham City Council believes lie detectors can help in the fight against the fraud. Not so - say the Government, which believes they're not accurate enough. The insurance industry is now looking at alternatives to lie detectors. They've commissioned Dr Sharon Leal, forensic psychologist at the University of Portsmouth, to devise an interview techniques that would help unmask those involved in deception. What's the best way to spot a deception? To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • November 21st 2010 at 23:37

Name Change Danger

By BBC Radio 5 live
Investigative journalism with Adrian Goldberg. At least 600 criminals have changed their identity to avoid the sex offenders register. In one case, it allowed a paedophile to travel to Bangkok - a known destination for sex pests. In another case, a child sex offender befriended a woman and her children after changing his name. The identity dodge also hampers the effectiveness of Sarah's Law, a system allows parents and others to check on individuals with access to children. It is relatively easy to change you name: it can cost as little as Β£13 and takes just a few days. But 5 live Investigates has found that there is no system for checking whether the people who are changing their identity are on the sex offenders register. Once they have changed their name - their new identity fails to show up past criminal convictions. To show how easy it is to change your name, Adrian changes his to James Brokenshire, the home office minister - but he declines to be interviewed. In the second half of the programe, we investigate the teaching of emotional intelligence in schools. An idea from a US bestseller, it was introduced in many classrooms five years ago and has cost around Β£40 million. The belief was that it would improve behaviour and raise attainment. But Government-sponsored research shows it's been ineffective, and some critics claim it's been damaging for kids. They say it amounts to therapy by the backdoor. The proponents and the critics go head to head. Plus, why councils are calling for tighter regulations to clamp down on rogue taxi drivers. A leaked report says that 93% of taxi drivers have invalid insurance, and that some are involved in crash for cash scams. The BBC's Inside Out West Midlands suggests that passengers and other motorists are being put at risk. So why can't local authorities ensure that those with a licence are properly covered? We hear from a victim of 'crash for cash'. A taxi driver hit her at very low speed, and then claimed for serious injuries. She then saw him involved in another similar crash. The Insurance Fraud Bureau is investigating the increase in claims. To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • November 28th 2010 at 23:02

Car Clocking

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg presents cutting edge investigative journalism, as well as taking on listeners' campaigns and consumer issues. New figures reveal that 1 in 39 vehicles have mileage lower than at their last MOT: that's 670,000 cars. It's led to calls for a tightening of the rules surrounding individuals and garages that offer 'mileage correction services.' Motorists are able to get their clocks turned back but if they sell their car, they must inform the new owner - otherwise it's fraud. 5 live Investigates found that six out of ten mileage correction services it contacted were willing to change the mileage reading knowing it was possibly to deceive a new owner. Listen to our secret recordings. Also, denied justice. The modern day slaves working for the rich and powerful in the UK. Despite being awarded damages for the abuse and exploitation they've suffered, many have yet to see a penny. They are domestic workers brought into the country by overseas diplomats and business people. They've been paid below the minimum wage and in some cases have suffered sexual harassment. They've taken their bosses to employment tribunals and won - but 5 live Investigates has found those tribunal rulings are being ignored with impunity. And Russian Spies: Just what are they after? We ask former MP Dr Kim Howells. To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • December 5th 2010 at 22:30

Drug Driving

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg presents cutting edge investigative journalism, as well as taking on listeners' campaigns and consumer issues. Drug drivers know that the chances that they'll be brought to book are low, say MPs. Why - after 10 years - has the Home Office still failed to introduce a roadside drugs test to tackle what's recognised as a lethal problem? In many other European countries, the police have small hand held screening kits. In Germany last year, they led to 34,500 drivers losing their licence. Figures for the UK - and for the previous year - reveal that only 168 drug driving guilty verdicts were recorded by the courts. Without a hand held test, UK police have to look for the tell-tale signs in the driver's general demeanour. In a damning assessment of the situation, MPs on the Transport Select Committee say: "At the moment, people assume - quite correctly - that they can take drugs and drive a vehicle with little chance of being caught." Also on the programme - Adrian asks why the UK food industry is doing so badly in controlling a bug that contaminates the outside of chickens and causes potentially-fatal food poisoning. More than 8 in 10 chickens are infected with campylobacter, which lives on the outside of the bird, and get on your hands or the work surface. The Food standards Agency is now putting pressure on supermarkets to improve conditions in the supply chain - they have been given 12 months. Adrian asks the British Retail Consortium why we have worse record than Romania. How safe are you and your computer after you've signed up to 'Operation Pay Back', the campaign to exact revenge on companies who've abandoned WikiLeaks? It's illegal, but will there be prosecutions? Your computer will have to be dis-infected otherwise it could be used for other campaigns you might not support. And Christmas crackers - why has the Government ruled that children under 16 can't buy a box of crackers to go with the turkey dinner? To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • December 13th 2010 at 10:08

Civil Recovery - High Street Justice?

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg presents cutting edge investigative journalism, as well as taking on listeners' campaigns and consumer issues High street shops are using 'civil recovery' procedures to seek compensation from suspected shoplifters - a vital process as some claim the courts are not interested in petty theft, which costs businesses millions of pounds a year. But should 'justice' be pursued by private companies? And should people be compelled to pay financial compensation without any official legal due process? Adrian Goldberg speaks to in-store security teams and civil recovery firms about the need to employ this increasingly common practice, and also hears from members of the public who are being pursued for compensation, when they - and the police - say they did nothing wrong. Also, as three Pakistan cricketers face an International Cricket Council tribunal in Qatar over allegations of match fixing, 5 live Investigates hears how the Professional Cricket Association is keeping tabs on players as it tries to spot those most vulnerable to the match-fixers - and in some instances paying off players debts to prevent them from falling prey to betting gangs. And are you paying too much council tax? 5 live Investigates reveals how you can check what your neighbours are paying and how you can appeal to pay a lower rate. If you have a story you want the team to investigate email goldberg@bbc.co.uk.

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  • January 9th 2011 at 23:30

Park Life Problems

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg investigates allegations of harassment and bullying against some of the estimated 220,000 Britons who now live permanently in "park homes" - high end mobile homes, which are cheaper than bricks and mortar. Across the UK, many retirees are spending their life savings on homes, which are often located on sites close to popular coastal resorts. These homes can change hands for hundreds of thousands of pounds, but many park home owners are finding the current law governing mobile homes gives the owners of park home sites a large amount of power over their lives. 5 live Investigates reveals the harrowing allegations of unscrupulous site owners, who are accused of using the law to harass and intimidate park home owners and ultimately take over ownership of their homes. Also: Following last week's report on civil recovery - the means by which retailers can pursue damages from alleged shoplifters outside the court system - Adrian hears from more listeners who say they have been unfairly targeted by shops. And the programme explores the rising trend of people being targeted by insurance fraudsters, who are making false claims against innocent drivers alleging they were involved in a crash. If you have a story for the 5 live Investigates team, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk.

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  • January 16th 2011 at 21:00

NHS Reforms - The Truth

By BBC Radio 5 live
Who is really behind the current NHS reforms and just how radical will they be? Health Minister Andrew Lansley is the face of the proposed reforms but Adrian Goldberg reveals how their design was very much a cross-party effort, with Labour special advisors central in their development. Speaking to some of the key insiders, he reveals how the extent of the proposed plans are much more radical than the coalition government is currently letting on - but who is running the show? As Andrew Lansley evangelises the benefits of these changes, is Prime Minister David Cameron really behind him?

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  • January 23rd 2011 at 23:34

Prison Riot Revelations

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg presents cutting edge investigative journalism. 2011 has got off to a rocky start for HM Prison Service, as inmates at Ford open prison in West Sussex rioted on New Year's Day. 5 live Investigates speaks exclusively to inmates currently serving in open prisons, including Ford. They reveal the issues they think lie behind a recent spate of disturbances. 5 live Investigates has heard from both prisoners and prison officers claiming that 'risk assessments' of inmates are not thorough enough and troublesome prisoners are being transferred to open prisons too soon. Also: Last year, 5 live Investigates spoke to Karen Murphy, the Portsmouth landlady taking on the Premier League and Sky Sports at the European Court of Justice. Ms Murphy is seeking to end Sky's monopoly over selling subscriptions to watch English Premier League football on TV in the UK, and says she should be able to subscribe to cheaper, foreign satellite companies under European law. We catch up with Karen as she waits for the ECJ to give its opinion next week in preparation of the final judgment. We also speak to industry insiders about the mood in Brussels, and ask which side is rumoured to have the upper hand. To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • January 30th 2011 at 23:57

ADHD Drug Cheats

By BBC Radio 5 live
5 live Investigates speaks exclusively to head teachers who claim stimulants are being over-prescribed to young children. They are raising the alarm on what they say is "over-prescription" of powerful medication to children from dysfunctional families, who have behavioural problems which make them "extremely naughty" - but who they suspect are not actually sufferers of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The number of prescriptions written for young people suffering from ADHD is skyrocketing, with around 420,000 issued for 16-17 year olds alone in 2007. ADHD is a serious psychiatric condition and amphetamine drugs are proven to help, but are children who don't need medication also ending up on powerful drugs that have major side effects? Teachers and psychologists tell the programme how some parents, struggling with difficult children and motivated by the benefits they could receive on Disability Living Allowance, seem to be pushing for a diagnosis of ADHD. They paint a picture in which schools are not always consulted by doctors - despite the fact that clinical best-practice is to ask schools first. In the week where the government is promising more money for 'talking therapies' for children, 5 live Investigates explores the real stories of children who have been prescribed powerful ADHD drugs which their teachers fear are inappropriate and are used to "just keep them quiet" rather than offer any real help. Also on the programme, meet Stephanie Spacey, who caught the wrong train from Coventry to London, and is now being taken to court by Virgin Trains in a case that could cost her almost Β£6,000. And the publishers selling books which consist entirely of articles copied from Wikipedia. Presented by Adrian Goldberg. To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • February 6th 2011 at 23:59

The XXX Files

By BBC Radio 5 live
5 live Investigates exposes the law firms making a mint by accusing innocent people of illegal downloading. As the entertainment industry cracked down on illegal file-sharing, an opportunity was spotted by law firms who sent tens of thousands of speculative letters to people claiming they had illegally downloaded music and pornographic films. The fear of having to fight such an embarrassing claim led many individuals to pay a fine, to make the problem go away. A recent court case has revealed one company has made up to Β£1 million from the scam, and as their operation is closed down, others are gearing up to step into their wake. 5 live Investigates speaks to former employees about the way these law firms operate - as well as those people wrongly accused of file-sharing - and tells the story of how an international community of hackers helped bring down the biggest player in this market. However, rather than clamp down on this problem, critics say the government's new Digital Economy Act - hastily passed during the previous Labour government's 'wash-up' period - could actually make these legal tactics even easier. Also on the programme, reaction to news that the Egyptian military is expected to ban from Monday union meetings and meetings of professional syndicates. Does it look as if the hopes of the protestors will be dashed? We speak to Professor Robert Springborg, an expert on the Egyptian military, who thinks the signs are ominous. FIFA has launched an investigation into match fixing, following an international friendly tournament in Turkey. Mihkel Uiboleht from the Estonian FA explains the situation. And the latest Direct Debit scam - fraudsters are using cashback websites to set up bogus direct debits for accounts they don't control and then pocketing cashback rewards. All they need are the bank account details. Charities, which publish their account details for potential donations, have been particularly badly hit. To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • February 13th 2011 at 23:35

Gay Muslim Marriage

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg presents cutting edge investigative journalism. British gay Muslims are joining the global fight for equality and seeking gay marriage. 5 live Investigates speaks to pioneering gay couples about their 'nikah' - a Muslim matrimonial contract - and asks how they balance their sexuality with the Islamic faith, which vehemently rejects homosexuality. Many gay couples who marry in this way say they have actively rejected secular civil partnerships, as they say it is vital to have their union recognised by Allah, and not just by the state. The ceremonies are based on heterosexual Muslim marriage ceremonies, and are often conducted in private, without the knowledge of the couple's family, for fear of damaging so-called 'honour'. However, there is also a view that the British Muslim community may not be as conservative as it appears - it is claimed a 'liberal closet' exists whereby some families are becoming more accepting of their gay children, albeit behind closed doors. Adrian speaks to one American imam, who has conducted a number of gay marriages in Britain - some of which have been grand events. Also on the programme, analysis of the uprising in Libya with Huda Abuzaid, whose father was assassinated in his butcher's shop in London by Gadaffi's henchmen in 1995. The high maintenance charges for people living in supposedly 'affordable housing'. And claims that the student visa system is being used to bring over qualified people for training, who are sent straight out on 'work placements', doing a job at less than the minimum wage. To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • February 20th 2011 at 23:19

Second hand car loans & Non-League Finances

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg presents cutting edge investigative journalism, as well as taking on listeners' campaigns and consumer issues. Unwitting second-hand car buyers are being chased for hundreds of pounds in debts on loans taken out by previous owners of their car. Drivers raising finance with so-called 'logbook loans' secured on their vehicles are selling on their cars before settling their accounts. Because logbook loans are secured using a Victorian law called the Bill of Sales Act, they offer much less protection to consumers than other forms of credit. Under the Act, a borrower taking out a logbook loan actually hands ownership of the vehicle over to the lender. Not only does that mean that the borrower has no legal right to sell on the vehicle but any innocent third party buying it also has no rights of ownership. 5 live Investigates speaks to one victim who paid Β£1,100 for a second-hand car. A year after buying the car, the owner received a letter from a loan company to say she wasn't the legal owner of the vehicle and was told would have to pay Β£600 to keep it - because the previous owner of the car had taken out a loan secured on the vehicle but had sold it on before settling all of his debts. It's estimated that around 40,000 bills of sale were registered in 2008-09 in England and Wales and experts warn these loans could become more popular as credit remains squeezed by mainstream lenders. The Trading Standards Institute says loans secured on bills of sale should be outlawed. The previous Labour government consulted on whether to ban the practice but the coalition government has decided not to legislate. Also on the programme, why are so many non-league clubs going to the wall? Is it that small businessmen have over-ambitious ideas, destroying the clubs they buy and letting down local creditors? John Beech of Coventry University has completed an extensive survey of non-league finances - he's discovered that there have been even more bankruptcies in non-league than league clubs. 5 live Investigates also speaks to Guy Cooper of Halesowen Town's supporters club, who tells how the club went broke, David Newton, the FA's head of integrity, and Kevin Rye of Supporters Direct. To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • February 27th 2011 at 23:26

Cross-Border Benefit Fraud

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg presents cutting edge investigative journalism. 5 Live Investigates uncovers disturbing evidence of Polish workers victimised by an elaborate credit, loans and benefits scam. Polish criminal gangs are luring impoverished young workers to Britain with the promise of work, and use a range of pressure tactics and lies to steal their identity. After encouraging their victims to open bank accounts and sign on for benefits, they then ditch them and send them home. They then use their identities to claim thousands of pounds in loans, hire purchase agreements, benefits and tax credits. 5 live Investigates speaks to victims and reveals a tale of cross-border fraud and trafficking which is exploiting some of Europe's poorest people in order to defraud the British banking system and the UK taxpayer. Also: last year 5 live Investigates reported on the trail of debt left in the UK by Indian businessman, Ahsan Ali Syed, who at the time was bidding to buy Blackburn Rovers FC. Having failed in his bid to buy Rovers, Mr Ali is now looking to invest in football clubs in Spain and New Zealand, but reports this week in the Australian press claim he is behind a multi-million dollar loan fraud. 5 live Investigates speaks to the reporters behind this latest scoop. Plus journalist Hugh Miles on his investigation for Radio 4 into the Libyan money trail. And 'log book loans' - following last week's investigations, listeners explain why it's so difficult to check whether there's an outstanding loan on a car.

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  • March 6th 2011 at 22:55

Sports Scholarships

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg with cutting edge investigations. Sports scholarships - With universities set to increase tuition fees, an increasing numbers of British students are now trying to win sports scholarships in the USA. But are they getting value for money? A number of agents are demanding upfront fees to arrange scholarships - but a number of parents say they are being made promises that don't materialise and are being forced to pay out thousands of pounds. We talk to the imam under sentence of death because he wanted to debate religion and evolution. The programme investigates the way the extremists are using the concept of Takfir - to denounce someone as a non-believer - as a way to intimidate communities and promote intolerance. And the bumpy journey ahead. Britain's pot holed roads are costing motorists millions of pounds in damage to cars. We reveal that our roads crisis has been aggravated by road engineers who've been using the wrong type of asphalt surfacing on the majority of our roads. To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk, or tweet @5LInvestigates.

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  • March 14th 2011 at 11:00

Stolen Fuel Crime

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg investigates the rise in fuel crime as the price of petrol and diesel reaches a high at the pump. Nearly two-thirds of hauliers say they've had fuel stolen from their lorries or from tanks in their storage yards in the past year, according to an industry questionnaire. Fewer than half of the affected trucking firms reported the thefts to the police - some feeling fuel crime gets a low priority. Garage owners are reporting an increase in the number of motorists who fill up and drive off without paying. And organised crime is involved in fuel racketeering - investigators from customs and revenue are busting more diesel laundering plants, where the dye put in duty-exempt agricultural diesel is washed out - so it can be passed off as diesel for general use. The loss in duty is believed to cost the public purse about Β£800 million a year. Also, just how safe is the UK nuclear industry? And we examine the work of the analysts using satellite images to track the unfolding crisis in Libya.

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  • March 21st 2011 at 19:16

Racism in Russian Football

By BBC Radio 5 live
Russia has pledged to tackle racism in football ahead of the 2018 World Cup. We investigate the depth of prejudice at one of Russia's most successful clubs. Zenit St Petersburg competes regularly at the top level of European football but has never signed a black player. The club has a following of dedicated fans called the Ultras - and they say they're proud that the club has never had a player of African heritage. The club says it trying to tackle racism. The Russian football authorities say they have launched a campaign to eradicate intolerance across football more generally. We ask if the approach is working. Also, we examine the epidemic of liver disease brought on by the way we lead our lives - and the impact it is having on an already-stretched NHS. And it's been a long time coming... the crackdown that's designed to get uninsured drivers off the roads.

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  • March 28th 2011 at 13:44

Adventure Holiday Safety Scare

By BBC Radio 5 live
Gap year safety. A coroner has called on the Government to review the safety procedures of companies offering gap year adventure trips. It follows the death of a student on a conservation holiday in Fiji. We investigate how well the companies are implementing safety procedures. Many police forces are still failing when it comes to investigating reports of disability hate crime, according to a number of leading charities. They say officers have not heeded the lessons of the tragic case of Fiona Pilkington who set fire to herself and her disabled daughter more than 3 years ago. The mother had been driven to despair by years of abuse targeted at the family. 5 Live Investigates talk to a woman with learning disabilities who's endured 20 years of abuse. She's been spat at, had chewing gum put in her hair, had kids get into her home and has been physically assaulted. The last time her mother reported it to the police she was told by an officer that it was naΓ―ve to think that her daughter would not be subjected to taunts. And tackling uninsured drivers... Following last week's debate about new plans to tackle uninsured drivers, and concerns that new penalties wont be tough enough, the Roads Minister Mike Penning comes onto the show to defend the scheme.

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  • April 4th 2011 at 11:15

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

By BBC Radio 5 live
Adrian Goldberg presents cutting edge investigative journalism, as well as taking on listeners' campaigns and consumer issues. Some nurses are defying their own professional standards when it comes to administering Botox. Botox is a prescription-only drug and has to be prescribed by a specialist nurse or a doctor in a face-to-face consultation. But some nurses are defying their own professional regulator by using what's called a remote prescribing service. A remote prescriber is a doctor who is contacted on the phone and issues a prescription after talking to the patient - sometimes for just three or four minutes. But new instructions from the nursing regulator, the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council, say remote prescribing should not be used for Botox. The regulations have been tightened to improve patient safety. But some nurses seem intent on defying them. 5 Live Investigates asks why - and examines the role of a Harley Street practice that still offers remote prescribing. Also, the number of people dying or made ill through carbon monoxide poisoning is being grossly under-estimated by the authorities. A charity that promotes the safety of heating systems says in cases of unexplained deaths, scientists are failing to test for signs of carbon monoxide. 5 Live Investigates looks into one case where a man died as a result of carbon monoxide and no one realised, leaving other tenants exposed to the poisonous gas for a further week which left them ill. The Health and Safety Executive has also been accused of not doing enough to investigate possible carbon monoxide cases. Some businesses are facing massive bills because their energy companies failed to read the meter properly. One company says it is facing closure because it says it can't afford the demand that's dropped through the letterbox. 5 Live Investigates finds that some of the problems have come about because meter readers didn't jot down all the figures. And the wrong sort of passengers forecasts: as the row over the new high speed rail route between London and the north of England intensifies, 5 Live Investigates asks why the rail industry doesn't seem to be able to correctly predict passenger figures. To contact the programme, email goldberg@bbc.co.uk - or send comments via Twitter to @5LInvestigates.

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  • April 18th 2011 at 12:30

Cyber Stalking

By BBC Radio 5 live
Who's watching you online? Cyber stalkers are using increasingly sophisticated means to target their victims. In some cases, they are deploying spyware to get remote access to their quarry's computer - to access files and personal information. They might even be able to turn on the webcam to secretly film their victim. 5 live Investigates talks to senior police officers who say they need tougher powers to be able to investigate cyber stalking more effectively. The programme hears from the victims of online stalking who've endured years of harassment and hate. To contact the programme, tweet @5LInvestigates.

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  • May 2nd 2011 at 13:00

NHS Staff Who Can't Speak English

By BBC Radio 5 live
In the news this week: the doctors and nurses who can't speak English. But 5 live Investigates can reveal the problem is even bigger than that. We hear that the poor English of some overseas professionals is causing confusion, mistakes and bad treatment across the whole of the healthcare system in the UK. We talk to patients and health insiders who say that some care workers, dentists and pharmacists - as well as doctors and nurses - cannot properly understand their patients. People arriving from the European Union do not have to pass English language tests to register to work. The General Medical Council, the Nursing and Midwifery Council and other healthcare bodies, say this needs to change. It's up to employers to assess an individual's fluency before they are given an actual job, but not all of them do this. And, 5 live Investigates finds, even some overseas NHS staff from outside Europe, who have passed language tests, struggle to communicate clearly.

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  • September 18th 2011 at 21:14
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